FootNotes

1. To avoid accusation of bias, the author freely quoted non-Jewish authorities.

2. Michaelis, Introduction to the New Testament, ed. Dr. Herbert Marsh (London, 1828), vol. 2, p. 368.

3. Von Mosheim, Ecclesiastical History (London, 1810), vol. 1, p. 109.

4. Rev. Robert Taylor, The Diegesis (Boston, 1873), p. 48.

5. Wake, Genuine Epistles of the Apostolical Fathers (London, 1719), p. 98.

6. Conyers Middleton, D.D., Letters from Rome (London, 1752), vol. 1, p. 51.

7. C. F. Volney, The Ruins (Boston, 1872), p. 177.

8. Middleton, vol. 1, p. 59.

9. Drs. H. Oort, I. Hooykaas, and A. Kuneh, The Bible for Learners, trans. Philip A. Wieksteed (Boston, 1878), vol. 3, p. 24.

10. Taylor, Diegesis, p. 66.

11. Ibid., p. 114.

12. Doane, p. 231.

13. Ibid.

14. Taylor, Syntagma of the Evidences of the Christian Religion (Boston, 1876), p. 52.

15. "Time Chart of Bible History" (New York/Glasgow/Toronto:William Collins and Sons and Co., 1971), p. 5.

16. John P. Lundy, Monumental Christianity (New York, 1876), pp. 151-152.

17. Ibid., pp. 151-152.

18. T. W. Doane, Bible Myths (New York, 1882), p. 286.

19. Williams, Indian Wisdom, or Examples of the Religious, Philosophical, and Ethical Doctrines of the Hindoos (London, 1875), p. iv.

20. Cox, The Myths of the Aryan Nations (London, 1870), vol. 2, p. 138.

21. Maurice, Hindostan, vol. 2, p. 316; Luke 1:57.

22. H. H. Wilson, trans., The Vishnu Purana, A System of Hindoo Mythology and Tradition (London, 1840), book 5, chap. 3; Luke 2:1-7.

23. Cox, vol. 2, p. 107.

24. Godfred Higgins, Anacalypsis: An Enquiry into the Origin of Languages, Nations and Religions (London, 1836), vol. 2, pp. 98.99.

25. Farrar, The Life of Christ (New York, 1876), p. 38.

26. Mons Dupuis, trans., The Origin of Alt Religious Worship (New Orleans, 1872), p. 134.

27. Swain, vol. 1, p. 259.

28. Thomas Maurice, History of Hindostan (London, 1798), vol. 2, p. 319; Matthew 8:2-4.

29. Maria L. Child, The Progress of Religious Ideas through Successive Ages (New York, 1855), vol. 1, p. 68.

30. Maurice, Hindostan, vol. 2, p. 320.

31. Maurice, Indian Antiquities (London, 1794), vol. 3, p. 46; Swain, vol. 1, p. 273; John 13:5.

32. Charles Wilkes, trans., The Bhagavat Gita, or Dialogues of Crishna and Arjoon, in Eighteen Lectures with Notes (London, 1785), p. 51; John 13:23.

33. Williams, Hinduism (London, 1877), p. 211.

34. Ibid., p. 213.

35. Ibid. p. 213.

36. Ibid., p. 213.

37. Higgins., p. 131; Acts 1:9.

38. Swain, vol. 1, p. 237; I Peter 3:19.

39. Wilson, p. 492.

40. Higgins, vol. 1, p. 144.

41. Lundy, p. 128.

42. Inman, Ancient Faiths and Modern (London, 1876), vol. 1, p. 411.

43. Child, vol. 1, p. 71.

44. Dupuis, p. 240; Matthew 28:6.

45. Child, voL 1, p. 75; Williams, Hinduism, p. 108.

46. Rhys Davids, Buddhism: Being a Sketch of the Life and Teachings of Gautama, the Buddha (London, 1894), p. 10.

47. Beal, The Romantic Legends of Sakya Buddha from the Chinese Sanskrit (London, 1875), p. vi

48. Ibid., pp. viii-ix.

49. De Bunsen, The Angel Messiah of Buddhists, Essenes and Christians (London, 1880), p. 50.

50. Muller, Introduction to the Science of Religion (London, 1873), p. 243.

51. Latourette, A History of Christianity (New York, 1975), p. 274.

52. Huc, Christianity in China, Tartary, and Thibet (London, 1857), p. 327.

53. Doane, p. 302.

54. De Bunsen, p. 45; Matthew 3:16.

55. De Bunsen, p. 37; Luke 2:41-48.

56. Arthur Lillie, Buddha and Early Buddhism (London, 1881), p. 100; Matthew 4:2.

57. Hans Joachim Schoeps, An Intelligent Person's Guide to the Religions of Mankind (London, 1967), p. 167; Matthew 21:18-19.

58. Encyclopedia Americana (New York: Rand McNally and Co., 1963), vol. 4, p. 672.

59. Moncure D. Conway, The Sacred Anthology (London, 1874), p. 173.

60. De Bunsen, p. 38.

61. Ibid.

62. Muller, Science, p. 27; Matthew 16:1.

63. Beal, p. x; Matthew 4:17.

64. Muller, Science, p. 140.

65. Ibid., p. 245.

66. Ibid., p. 249.

67. Ibid., p. 28.

68. R. Spence Hardy, The Legends and Theories of the Buddhists Compared with History and Science (London, 1866), p. 181.

69. Prof. Max Muller, ed., Sacred Books of the East (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879-1910), vol. 21, p. 129f.

70. James Hastings, ed., Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics (New York: Edinburgh T. & T. Clark, 1918), vol. 6, p. 883; Matthew 26:20.

71. Hardy, Monarchism, p. 6; Luke 14:33.

72. Hastings, vol. 6, p. 883.

73. Lillie, p. 139.

74. Muller, Science, p. 243.

75. Encyclopedia Britannica (New York: William and Helen Benton, 1974), vol. 2, p. 373.

76. Hardy, Legends, p. 134.

77. Hastings, vol. 6, p. 883.

78. Hardy, Eastern Monachism (London, 1860), p. 230.

79. De Bunsen, p. 49.

80. Thomas Thornton, A History of China from the Earliest Records to the Treaty with Great Britain in 1842 (London, 1844), vol. 1, p. 341.

81. Child, vol. 1, p. 229, Acts 3:6-8.

82. Maurice, Hindostan, vol. 2, p. 310.

83. Doane, p. 291.

84. Maurice, Hindostan, vol. 2, p. 310; Matthew 1:18.

85. Higgins, vol. 1, p. 157.

86. Ibid., pp. 129-130.

87. Maurice, Hindostan, vol. 2, pp. 317, 336; de Bunsen, pp. 22-23, 33; Matthew 2:2.

88. Ibid., p. 329.

89. Beal, p. 56.

90. Samuel Johnson, Oriental Religions and Their Relation to Universal Religion (India) (Boston, 1872), p. 500; Inman, vol. 2, p. 353.

91. De Bunsen, p. 36; Amberly Viscount, An Analysis of Religious Belief (New York, 1879), p. 231.

92. Maurice, Hindostan, vol. 2, p. 319; Muller, Science, p. 27; Matthew 4:23.

93. Williams, Hinduism, p. 215.

94. De Bunsen, p. 45; Beal, p. 177.

95. Maurice, Indian Antiquities, vol. 4, p. 372; John Francis Davis, The Chinese (New York, 1836), vol. 2, p. 104; Matthew 28:19.

96. Williams, Hinduism, p. 214.

97. Prof. Max Muller, History of Sanskrit Literature (London, 1872), p. 80.

98. Wilkes, p. 51.

99. Ibid., p. 52.

100. De Bunsen, p. 33.

101. Johnson, p. 504; Dupuis, p. 366; II Timothy 4:1.

102. Doane, p. 285.

103. Child, vol. 1, p. 72.

104. Ibid., p. 247.

105. Johnson, p. 604.

106. De Bunsen, p. 18.

107. Ibid.

108. Ibid.

109. In Deuteronomy 27:11-26, the Jews were told that after entering the Land of Israel, each curse would be read to them and they would respond with "Amen" after each one. For instance: "Cursed be he that dishonors his father or mother. And all the people shall say: Amen" (Deuteronomy 27:16). The actual performance of this ceremony is related in Joshua 8:30-35.

110. The original Hebrew "sar," here translated as "prince," literally means a govern ment minister. This title would. naturally apply to Hezekiah, but not to Jesus.

111. The Hebrew word "mahatz" is in the past tense; therefore, it should not be translated as "will shatter," as missionaries misinterpret it.

112. For the remaining half week, Jerusalem was under siege for three years by Vespasian, and for half a year by his son, Titus.

113. Rashi. The Jews lowered two baskets of gold coins daily over the wall to the Roman soldiers, who in turn hoisted up two lambs. Thus the obligatory daily offering continued until the destruction of the Temple (Jerusalem Talmud, Taanith 4:5).

114. Jewish dates have been used (rather than the Christian ones) because they can be verified by means of the Hebrew Bible.

The exodus from Egypt occurred in 2448, as is clear from the lifetimes of the following men (as recorded in Genesis and Exodus): Adam (1-930), Methusaleh (687-1656), Shem (1558-2158), Jacob (2108-2255), Amram (2255-2392), Moses (2368 + 80 [his age at the time of the exodus] = 2448).

Construction of the First Temple began in the fourth year of King Solomon's reign, i.e., 480 years after the exodus (I Kings 6:1). Solomon reigned for another thirty-six years, (I Kings 11:42) whereupon a succession of kings occupied the throne for 374 years, until the First Temple was destroyed (II Chronicles 12:13 to 36:11). Thus, 2448 + 480 + 36 + 374 = 3338.

115. The breakdown of the seventy weeks is according to Rashi. This year (1990) coincides with the year 5750. The Second Temple was de¬stroyed in 68 C.E. (1,922 years ago). 5750-1,922 = 3828.

7 weeks' x 7 = 49 years. The remaining 3 years (52-49) are carried forward. 62 weeks' x 7 = 434 years. The extra 4 years (438-434) are carried forward. The above 7 surplus years (3+4) make up this last week of years.

116. Interlinear Greek-English New Testment (King James Version) (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1984), p. 86.

117. Often in the Hebrew Bible, names are either shortened or changed. In this instance, Jeconiah was shortened to Coniah. Compare Jeremiah 27:20 with 37:1.

118. Not even Jeconiah's grandson, Zerubbabel, who led the Babylonian Jewish exiles back to the Holy Land, ascended the throne. Rather, Jeconiah's uncle succeeded him (II Kings 24:17). Paul, who did not author the books of the New Testament in which these genealogies are found, understood the problems they present. There¬fore, out of frustration, he wrote: "And I urged you [Timothy] when I was going to Macedonia, remain at Ephesus that you may charge certain persons not to teach any different doctrine, nor to occupy themselves with myths and endless genealogies, which promote speculations rather than the divine training that is in faith" (I Timothy 1:3-4), and "But avoid foolish questions, and genealogies, dimensions, and quarrels about the law, for they are unprofitable and futile" (Titus 3:9).

119. This is the meaning of "fringe" in the original New Testament Greek. The same word is used when Jesus upbraids the Pharisees for their "self-aggrandisement": "But all their works they do for to be seen by men; they make broad their phylacteries and enlarge the fringes of their garments..."(Matthew 23:5).

Phylacteries are boxes containing Torah passages. During morning prayers, Jewish males wear them strapped to their forehead and arm, as commanded: "And you shall bind them for a sign upon your arm, and they shall be frontiers between your eyes" (Deuteronomy 6:8).

120. Jesus here condemns himself, for twice he called the Pharisees fools:

1) "You blind fools! For which is greater, the gold or the temple that has made the gold sacred?" (Matthew 23:17).

2) You fools! Did not he who made the outside make the inside also?" (Luke 11:40).

121. Josephus writes: "So these high priests, upon the coming of their feast which is called the Passover, when they slay their sacrifices, from the ninth hour to the eleventh, but so that a company not less than ten belong to every sacrifice, for it is not lawful for them to feast singly by themselves, and many of us are twenty in a company, found the number of sacrifices was 256,500; which, upon the allowance of no more than ten that feast together, amounts to 2,565,000 persons that were pure and holy..." (Wars of the Jews, book 6, chap. 9, sec. 3).

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